PSA: Stop Slut Shaming!

FULL TRANSCRIPT

A black screen shows up with the white words: "PSA: STOP SLUT SHAMING" and below those words, "PHI KAPPA ZETA SORORITY."

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Another black screen shows up with the white words: "Warning: Video Includes Trigger Words."

***WHAT IS SLUT SHAMING?***

Sister Hillary Adelaide Peters is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a solid colored brown shirt with her hair down. Three bracelets are on her right hand. She has a somber expression as she says:

"Slut shaming is the idea of shaming and/or attacking a woman or a girl for: being sexual, having one or more sexual partners, acknowledging/talking about sexual feelings, and/or acting on sexual feelings.

Sister Margaret Sue Kopp is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a solid colored black shirt with her hair up, bangs prominent on her face. A tattoo is on her left bicep. She has a serious face on as she says:

“Slut shaming is when society makes a woman feel guilty and inferior for being open about her sexuality or for not following society's expectations about sex, such as having sex before marriage, sex with multiple partners, being open about her sex life, et cetera.”

Sister Kaleen Marie Hatfield is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a black solid colored shirt with a grey cardigan. Her blonde hair is tied back and she is wearing black framed glasses. Her face is serious as she signs out: “Slut shaming damages not only the girls and women who are targeted, but society as a whole.”

***HOW DOES IT HAPPEN?***

Sister Lourdes Valenzuela is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a black solid shirt with a decorative necklace. Her silver hair is highlighted with purple and blue, her expression calm as she signs out: “Slut shaming happens when a person publicly or privately insults a woman because she expressed her sexuality in a way that doesn’t follow society’s expectations.”

Sister Brittany Ann Farr is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a black solid long-sleeved shirt with a white fluffy scarf. Her black curly hair is down and pinned to the side, her tone informative as she signs out: “Slut shaming happens to women who are not ashamed/open about their sex lives and are sexually aggressive but it can happen to any woman who’s had sex… even virgins!”

Sister Lauren Rose-Zita Goldberg  is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a light grey solid long-sleeved shirt with a maroon scarf. Her hair is tied up into a bun, her face is light as she says: “FYI - you can still be slut shaming someone even if you don’t use the word ‘slut.’”

***SEXUAL DOUBLE STANDARD & “MALE SLUTS”***

Sister Alanna Clara Laughrey is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a tan solid shirt, her blonde hair is down past her shoulders. She is wearing wire rimmed glasses as she informs with a neutral expression: “Did you know that in a study of North American English, it was identified that there were 220 words for a sexually promiscuous woman, but only 20 for a sexually promiscuous man?”

Sister Tarja Megan Lewis is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a dark grey patterned shirt. Her hair is pulled back into a bun and her wide framed, red glasses encircles her eyes. She is descriptive as she says: “The 220 words to describe promiscuous women all have negative meaning behind them, except for one word which was neutral: “sex-kitten.”

Whereas the 20 words that describe promiscuous men were words like “Don Juan,” “Casanova,” and “Romeo”… Those words have historical meaning behind them and do not have negative meanings behind them, and they imply that the male is cool or suave for being promiscuous. “

Sister Brittany Ann Farr appears again, saying: “The word, “slut,” has different meanings when applied to men and when it’s applied to women. When men are called sluts, it’s just to criticize his sexual habits or private life. When women are called sluts, it’s to dismiss what she’s saying, what she’s doing, or even dismissing her worth as a person. Slut. Same word, but the impact on both genders are very different.”

***WHY DO PEOPLE SLUT SHAME?***

Sister Margaret Sue Kopp appears again, signing out: “Why do people slut shame? It’s a cheap and easy way to feel superior. Calling a woman a slut (or any other derogatory sexual word) makes the accuser feel like they are the better person and that they are more “important” than the “slut.” 

***CONSEQUENCES OF SLUT SHAMING***

Sister Lauren Rose-Zita Goldberg appears again, saying: “You might think calling a woman a slut is not a big deal but know this --- once a young woman receives a reputation for being a “slut,” it can damage her self-perception (self-confidence) for years. People  could start to see her sexual openness as an invitation to treat her like a sex object, which could possibly lead to her being a target for different types of harassment or something even worse. 

Sister Kaleen Marie Hatfield appears again, signing out: “If a woman has the reputation of being a “slut,” she could either, despite not being sexually active before the slut shaming, become extremely sexually active with a large number of partners or she might become resistant to others and shut down her sexual side completely, wearing baggy clothes and being unable to allow even her partner to touch her.”

Sister Briella Maria Diaz is standing in front of a white tiled background surrounded by soft light. She is wearing a dark purple solid long-sleeved shirt. Her hair is tied back in a messy bun and her tone is firm as she says: “How many times has rape been discounted because a woman was deemed a slut? How many times are women called whores while their partners beat them? How often are women’s sexual histories used against them in workplace harassment cases?

The sexual double standard is not okay, and it is dangerous and it is not safe. 

***WHAT CAN YOU DO ABOUT IT?***

Sister Lourdes Valenzuela appears again, smiling as she says: “We need to teach society to respect women as individuals and as a whole.”

Sister Hillary Adelaide Peters appears again, her tone soft as she signs out: “Parents should be open about sexuality with their children; they should teach their daughters and sons that girls as well as boys have sexual feelings, and that sexual feelings are entirely normal.”

Sister Briella Maria Diaz appears again, her tone informative as she signs: “Teachers must recognize that slut-bashing is a serious problem, not something that is normal for “high school life.” Slut-shaming is a form of sexual harassment. If a teacher witnesses slut-shaming, they must make sure that it stops. This is why it’s so important for teachers and school administrators to educate their students on why sexual harassment is not okay. 

Sister Alanna Clara Laughrey appears again, signing out: “Many of us know that the stigma surrounding sluts is unfair and unnecessary but we STILL use the word slut as an insult. Society’s influence on us is too strong, we have to remind ourselves to be aware of sexual double standards every day. If we become aware of our behavior, then we will have the power to stop.

Sister Tarja Megan Lewis appears again in conclusion, wrapping it up as she says: “But the most important thing that all of us (men and women) need to work on is this: to stop calling or thinking of women as “sluts.” Stand up for women everywhere when you speak out against slut shaming. If you see something that bothers you, say something.”

Information received from https://finallyfeminism101.wordpress.com/2010/04/04/what-is-slut-shaming/